Troop 31 Jobs

There are many jobs our scouts can do to help keep the troop running smoothly.  Each represents an opportunity to learn and take on leadership responsibility in ways that help through out each scout's future.

Junior Asst Scoutmaster

A Scout at least 16 years of age who has shown outstanding leadership skills may be appointed by the Scoutmaster to serve as a junior assistant Scoutmaster (JASM). The junior assistant Scoutmaster functions just like an assistant Scoutmaster (except for leadership responsibilities reserved for adults 18 years of age or older). In this capacity, junior assistant Scoutmasters (a troop may have more than one) follow the guidance of the Scoutmaster in providing support and supervision to other youth leaders in the troop. Upon their 18th birthday, a junior assistant Scoutmaster will be eligible to become an assistant Scoutmaster.
 

Responsibilities

  • performs duties as assigned by the Scoutmaster.

  • sets a good example.

  • wears the Scout uniform correctly

  • lives by the Scout Oath and Law.

  • shows Scout spirit

Senior Patrol Leader

With three green bars behind the Scout emblem, the senior patrol leader’s shoulder patch symbolizes one of the oldest leadership positions in Scouting. The Boy Scouts of America has long recognized the senior patrol leader as the highest youth leadership position in a troop. They are the primary link between a troop’s Scouts and its adult leaders. They shoulder the responsibility for leading meetings of the troop and the Greenbar and provide valuable leadership in planning and carrying out the troop’s program of outdoor activities, service projects, and events.


Responsibilities

  • runs all troop meetings, events, activities, and the annual program planning conference

  • corresponds to all scouts weekly

  • runs court of honors

  • runs the monthly Greenbar meetings

  • appoints other troop junior leaders with the advice and counsel of the Scoutmaster

  • assigns duties and responsibilities to junior leaders, follows up to make sure duties are completed

  • assists the Scoutmaster with junior leader training

  • sets a good example

  • wears the Scout uniform correctly

  • lives by the Scout Oath and Law

shows Scout spirit

Asst. Senior Patrol Leader

The assistant senior patrol leader is the second highest youth leadership position in the troop, working closely with the senior patrol leader to help the troop move forward. The assistant senior patrol leader acts as the senior patrol leader in the absence of the senior patrol leader or when called upon, and provides leadership to other youth leaders in the troop. The assistant senior patrol leader is appointed by the senior patrol leader under the guidance of the Scoutmaster

Responsibilities

lends a hand controlling the patrols and building patrol spirit

Troop Guide

Troop guides serve as both a leader and a mentor to the members of the new-Scout patrol. They should be an older Scout who holds at least the First Class rank and can work well with younger Scouts.  The troop guide helps the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol lead their patrol, so they can develop into a well-functioning group, working together harmoniously and productively.

 

Responsibilities

  • introduces new Scouts to troop operations

  • guides new Scouts from harassment by older Scouts

  • helps new Scouts towards earning the First Class rank

  • teaches basic Scout skills

  • coaches the patrol leader of the new-Scout patrol on his duties

  • works with the patrol leader at patrol leaders’ council meetings

  • attends Greenbar meetings with the Patrol leaders of the new-Scout patrol

  • counsels individuals Scouts on Scouting challenges

  • sets a good example

  • wears the Scout uniform correctly

  • lives by the Scout Oath and Law

  • shows Scout spirit

Patrol Leader

The patrol leader is the patrol’s key leader, representing the patrol at all patrol leaders’ council meetings and the annual program planning conference, and keeping patrol members informed of decisions made. Patrol leaders carry out planning, leading, and evaluating patrol meetings and activities, and assure patrols are prepared to participate in all troop activities. They keep their patrol intact so they can work together and share responsibilities to get things done. It is incumbent upon them to be a good example for the members of their patrol and the rest of the troop.


Responsibilities

  • plans and leads patrol meetings and activities

  • keeps patrol members informed

  • assigns each patrol member a specific duty

  • represents his patrol at all Greenbar meetings and the annual program planning conference

  • prepares the patrol to participate in all troop activities

  • works with other troop leaders to make the troop run well

  • knows the abilities of each patrol member

  • sets a good example

  • wears the Scout uniform correctly

  • lives by the Scout Oath and Law

  • shows and develops patrol spirit

Quartermasters

Quartermasters serve as the troop’s supply boss. They keep an inventory of troop equipment and see that the gear is in good condition. They work with patrol quartermasters as they check out equipment and return it. At meetings of the patrol leaders’ council they report on the status of equipment in need of replacement or repair. In carrying out their responsibilities, they may have the guidance of a member of the troop committee.


Responsibilities

  • keeps records on patrol and troop equipment

  • makes sure equipment is in good working condition

  • issues equipment and makes sure it is returned in good condition

  • makes suggestions for new or replacement items

  • works with the troop committee member responsible for equipment

  • sets a good example

  • wears the Scout uniform correctly

  • lives by the Scout Oath and Law

shows Scout spirit

Scribe

The scribe is the troop’s secretary. Though not a voting member, they attend the Greenbar meetings and keep a record of the discussions. They cooperate with the patrol scribes to record attendance and dues payments at troop meetings and to maintain troop advancement records. The troop scribe may be assisted by a member of the troop committee.


Responsibilities

  • attends and keeps a log of patrol leaders’ council meetings

  • records individual Scout attendance and dues payments

  • records individual Scout advancement progress

  • works with the troop committee member responsible for records and finance

  • begins each meeting with a game or fun activity

  • sets a good example

  • wears the Scout uniform correctly

  • lives by the Scout Oath and Law

  • shows Scout spirit

Historian

The historian collects, assembles, and preserves troop photographs, news stories, trophies, flags, scrapbooks, awards, and other memorabilia, and makes materials available for Scouting activities, courts of honor, the media, and troop history projects.


Responsibilities

  • gathers photos and facts about troop activities and keeps them in a historical file or scrapbook

  • takes care of troop trophies, ribbons, and souvenirs of troop activities

  • keeps information about former members of the troop

  • sets a good example

  • wears the Scout uniform correctly

  • lives by the Scout Oath and Law

  • shows Scout spirit

Instructor

Each instructor is an older troop member proficient in a Scouting skill who must also have the ability to teach that skill to others. An instructor typically teaches subjects that Scouts are eager to learn—especially those such as first aid, camping, and backpacking—that are required for outdoor activities and rank advancement. A troop can have more than one instructor.


Responsibilities

  • teaches basic Scouting skills

  • schedule/coordinate merit badge counselor(s) for troop/Scout instruction

  • sets a good example

  • wears the Scout uniform correctly

  • lives by the Scout Oath and Law

  • shows Scout spirit

Webmaster

Troop webmasters are responsible for maintaining the troop’s website. They make sure that information posted on the website is correct and up to date and that the privacy of youth and adult troop members is protected. A member of the troop committee may assist them with their work.


Responsibilities

  • works with various unit members on needed topics

  • ensures the website is as youth-run as possible

  • maintains the website as needed

  • sets a good example

  • correctly wears the Scout uniform correctly

  • shows Scout spirit

Order of the Arrow Representative

Order of the Arrow representatives serve as a communication link between the troop and the local Order of the Arrow lodge. By enhancing the image of the Order as a service arm to the troop, they promote the OA, encourage Scouts to take part in all sorts of camping opportunities, and helps pave the way for older Scouts to become involved in high-adventure programs.


Responsibilities

  • attends troop, chapter and lodge meetings regularly as a youth representative of the troop and Order

  • serves as a two-way communication link between the troop and the lodge or chapter

  • arranges with the lodge or chapter election team to conduct an annual Order of the Arrow election for the troop at a time approved by the patrol leaders council

  • arranges with the lodge or chapter for at least one camp promotion visit to the unit annually

  • makes at least one high adventure presentation to the troop, to include the OA programs, annually

  • participates in troop courts of honor, as requested by the senior patrol leader, by recognizing: high adventure participation of troop members, induction of new OA members, changes in OA honors of troop members, and other appropriate activities

  • coordinates the ordeal induction process for newly elected candidates by: ensuring they know the time and location of the ordeal, providing information of what to bring to the ordeal, assisting (as needed) in arranging transportation to the ordeal, and offering assistance (as needed) to the lodge in the ordeal process

  • assists current ordeal members in the troop in sealing their membership by becoming brotherhood members by: ensuring they know the time and location of brotherhood opportunities, assisting (as needed) in arranging transportation to the brotherhood opportunities, and offering assistance to the lodge (as needed) in the brotherhood process

  • offers periodic training and discussions of OA principles, symbolism, and the Legend as needed by and appropriate for the troop members of the Order, at the discretion of the PLC

  • assists the troop (as appropriate) as a trainer of leadership and outdoor skills.

  • advocates environmental stewardship and Leave No Trace camping

  • sets a good example by: wearing the Scout uniform correctly, showing Scout spirit, and living by the Scout Oath, the Scout law, and the OA Obligation

Outdoor Ethics Guide

Outdoor ethics guides help troops plan and conduct an outdoor program that emphasizes effectively practicing the Outdoor Code, the Leave No Trace principles, and the Tread Lightly! principles. Guides work to help Scouts improve their outdoor ethics decision-making skills to help minimize impacts as they hike, camp, and participate in other outdoor activities. In particular, they should support Scouts who are working to complete the relevant requirements for the Tenderfoot, Second Class, and First Class ranks.

Responsibilities

  • assures the troop adheres to the Principles of Leave No Trace, Tread Lightly, and the Outdoor Code

  • sets a good example

  • wears the Scout uniform correctly

  • lives by the Scout Oath and Law

  • shows Scout spirit

Let's Work Together

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